Friday, April 17, 2015

Curriculum Fair Shopping and Survival Tips

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Curriculum Fair Shopping and Survival Tips @ Homeschool Coffee Break - kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

One week from today the first of the homeschool conventions and curriculum fairs in my area opens. It's the MACHE (Maryland) curriculum fair - no workshops and speakers and seminars - just the vendor hall. Next month is CHAP, the "big time" homeschool convention and curriculum fair in Pennsylvania. I attend the MACHE fair every year, and have attended CHAP numerous times. I've also been to a Teach Them Diligently convention. This year I have plans only for the curriculum fair, and I've got a few practical tips for surviving the season!

For new homeschoolers, and even for veterans that haven't been to a fair or convention, it can be overwhelming and intimidating. But if you do a little homework, you can save yourself some stress and make sure your convention experience is encouraging.

Plan to be inspired and encouraged.
Especially if you're attending a conference with some great speakers, you can expect to hear great ideas and challenging messages about being the best you can be at educating your children. There's a flipside though - homeschool moms can easily fall into the trap of thinking that if we can just do it like this or that expert says, then we will be successful; or if we don't do something the way so-and-so recommends, then we're doing it wrong. Go into any speaker's session with the mindset that you will glean what's most useful and appropriate for you out of  what you hear, but not feel guilty for not applying every piece of advice. It's just like all the well-meaning advice you get when you're a brand-new parent - listen politely, evaluate what will suit you, and leave the rest.

Curriculum Fair Shopping and Survival Tips @ Homeschool Coffee Break - kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
Manage your time and energy.
This is hilarious advice, coming from me, because I'm not usually good at it. But I have learned how to plan my time at homeschool conventions. Prioritize. Are you there for the speakers, the vendors, or both? Which speakers are most important to you? Check the schedule and block out those chunks of time. Two workshops on at the same time? Most conventions offer recordings of the workshops, so if you're faced with this dilemma, you can probably get one of the workshops on CD or download. Check the map as well. If the speakers you want to hear are on the 3rd floor at 1pm and 2:30pm, with only a half hour break in between, it's probably not going to work to go down to the vendor hall on the first floor during that half hour. You'd probably be wiser to take that half hour for a bathroom break, a snack, and a bit of a relax.

Know why you're in the vendor hall.
Make a list and check it twice.
With the ease of online shopping, why would we want to buy from the vendors at the convention? Well, a couple of reasons come to mind. One is event pricing. Sometimes there's a discount or sale price offered as a convention special, and it's not unusual for vendors to waive shipping fees if you order from the convention. Another reason is being able to really see what you're getting. Personally, I like to be able to flip through the book, and read a little here and there. A third reason might be the personal touch. Many of the vendors are small, family-run businesses, and the chance for them to interact with their customers and potential customers is valuable on both sides. Sometimes I like to stop at the table of a favorite vendor and be able to speak directly to an author to tell them how much we appreciate their materials.  

So if you know exactly what you need to buy for next school year, make your shopping list. Do some research before you go, so that you know what the online prices are, including any shipping or taxes. That way you know whether the convention prices are better or not. If there's anything you're not completely sure about, plan to pick it up and hold it in your hands and ask questions about it at the convention. 

My strategy for the MACHE fair has often been to attend on Friday evening with only my shopping list in hand. I have all evening to browse and jot down ideas and prices in my shopping list notebook. Then I can go home and think and pray, maybe get some input from my students, and do a little more online research. On Saturday, when my time is usually a little shorter, I stop by the fair knowing exactly which booths to visit again and what I will purchase when I get there. This has saved me from paying too much or making snap decisions on a number of occasions.

Keep an open mind.
A few of our favorite resources have been things I found at a curriculum fair that I would not have considered otherwise. There is always something new to consider, even for those of us that make it our business to blog about homeschool products! Some notable examples from our homeschool include Practical Drafting from Insight Technical Education. I noticed this book and Graphic Design while browsing through an art supply vendors books. I would not have known about it otherwise, and it has turned out to be most useful for my boys.

Curriculum Fair Shopping and Survival Tips @ Homeschool Coffee Break - kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

This past year Kennady has been using Visits to Europe from Simply Charlotte Mason. She knew she wanted to study the geography and culture of Europe, but we hadn't found a curriculum at her grade level that covered the material she wanted. I happened to see these books at the Simply Charlotte Mason booth at TTD last year. The very helpful lady at the booth offered to answer my questions, and I had a ton of them! It turns out that I was talking directly to the author, who was ever so gracious and kind, and the book turned out to be almost exactly what we had in mind. 
Curriculum Fair Shopping and Survival Tips @ Homeschool Coffee Break - kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Y'know... even Life of Fred... I pretty much figured this might be what would work for math for Kennady, but I felt much better about purchasing the first couple of books at a curriculum fair after being able to page through them.

Curriculum Fair Shopping and Survival Tips @ Homeschool Coffee Break - kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Go with a friend.
If you have to travel, share the ride and save on gas money. So that's practical! If you're with a friend, you can also divide and conquer when it comes to speakers. I'll go hear this one, you go hear that one, and we'll share what we each heard over lunch. And the advice of a fellow homeschooling friend can be the voice of reason when you're torn between this science text or that one.... hmmmm...

And of course, it's just more fun with a friend! I've also had the opportunity to meet up with friends that I've made online while at homeschool conventions, which is pretty exciting!
Curriculum Fair Shopping and Survival Tips @ Homeschool Coffee Break - kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Curriculum Fair Shopping and Survival Tips @ Homeschool Coffee Break - kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

What are your survival tips for homeschool conventions? Or what are your questions about conventions? Leave a comment and let me know!

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 ©2006-2015 Homeschool Coffee Break. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. http://kympossibleblog.blogspot.com/

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Virtual Refrigerator - Symmetry

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Virtual Refrigerator - Art Link-up
Welcome to another edition of the Virtual Refrigerator! This weekly blog hop is co-hosted by A Glimpse of Our LifeHomeschool Coffee Break, and Every Bed of Roses. We all cordially invite you to add your link sharing the art that's on your Virtual Refrigerator and then hop over to the other blogs and admire what's on their Fridges! 
  Every Bed of Roses

April's Art Challenge: Easter and Nature
Throughout the month of April, we'll be especially interested in seeing artwork that focuses on the theme of Easter! Since Easter was right at the beginning of the month, we have another theme as well - Nature! Please continue to share any art posts on our Virtual Fridge as well - we love seeing all of them!

Kennady found an art project to fill some time and use up some bits of watercolor paint. A lesson in Geography Through Art focused on folk art from Switzerland that features intricate symmetrical designs. The project suggestion was to draw half a flower or some other design on half of a folded piece of paper, paint it, and then press the folded halves together while the paint is still wet. I guess Kennady wasn't in the mood for drawing a design because she experimented with splotches of paint...
Symmetry on the Virtual Fridge @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

and with some random designs.
Symmetry on the Virtual Fridge @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

But of course I like the flower design best.
Symmetry on the Virtual Fridge @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

What's on your Virtual Fridge this week? Leave a comment, share a link, and let us know!

You can grab the button above and add it to your post. Add your link here to share your child's art or your arts and crafts how-to posts. Please visit the other blogs and admire what's on their Virtual Refrigerators!








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 ©2006-2015 Homeschool Coffee Break. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. http://kympossibleblog.blogspot.com/

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

A Taste of Europe - Andorra

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Homeschool Coffee Break - A Taste of Europe - Andorra @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Things were a little busy here at the Homeschool Coffee Break last week, so I saved our latest Taste of Europe for today. Just over a week ago, we tried a dessert from the country of Andorra.

Homeschool Coffee Break - A Taste of Europe - Andorra @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Andorra is one of Europe's smallest countries, landlocked high in the Pyrenees Mountains between Spain and France. Its culture is very much a mix of Spanish and French. Both French and Spanish money were legal tender until the Euro was adopted. The official language in Andorra is Catalan, which is a Romance language that originated in northeastern Spain and nearby regions of France. Tradition holds that Charlemagne granted Andorra independence in exchange for their help in fighting the Moors. The Principality has existed since 1278 AD. The economy is driven mostly by tourism, thanks to its winter and summer resorts, ski resorts, and duty-free status.

Homeschool Coffee Break - A Taste of Europe - Andorra @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

As with some of the other smaller countries in Europe, I wondered whether we'd even find dishes that were clearly associated with the region, but once again, Global Table Adventure came through. I found a delicious dessert called Brac de Gitano to try. It's a thin cake rolled up with an apricot and whipped cream filling.  I feel like I left my cake in the oven perhaps a couple of minutes too long, as it tended to crack when I rolled it, so it isn't as pretty as it could have been. But what does that matter, when it's so delicious!

Homeschool Coffee Break - A Taste of Europe - Andorra @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Brac de Gitano (Cream Roll)
Cake:
4 eggs, separated
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup flour
pinch salt
2 tbsp butter
1 tsp almond extract

Filling:
1 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup plus 5 tbsp apricot jam

In a large bowl, whisk the egg yolks with sugar until pale yellow. Add flour, salt, butter, and almond extract. In another bowl, beat the egg whites until stiff. Add about 1/3 of the egg whites to the yolk mixture and stir just until combined. Then fold in the remaining egg whites. Pour into a prepared jelly roll pan (greased and lined with parchment paper), and bake at 350*F for 25 minutes or until golden brown. Allow to cool slightly before removing from the pan. Turn it onto a sugared tea towel or sheet of plastic wrap and roll into a tube. Let it cool to room temperature before filling.

For the filling, whip the cream until it forms soft peaks. Stir about a 1/3 of the whipped cream into the 5 tbsp of jam (bring jam to room temperature first). Then fold in the remaining whipped cream, just until combined. 

Unroll the cake. Spread it with the 1/2 cup jam and then the whipped cream filling. Reroll and refrigerate for a couple of hours. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup each of powdered sugar and cocoa mixed together, and garnish with slivered almonds, if desired. Slice into rounds and serve cold. With coffee. Mmmmm.... light and refreshing!
Homeschool Coffee Break - A Taste of Europe - Andorra @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

 
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 ©2006-2015 Homeschool Coffee Break. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. http://kympossibleblog.blogspot.com/

Monday, April 13, 2015

Middle School Monday - A Little Hands-On Science

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Middle School Monday @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Welcome to Middle School Monday! We've been a bit hit and miss with our Science study over the past several weeks - and unfortunately more miss than hit! Well, I've decided that we'd slacked on it for much too long, and that we needed to do a little homeschool boot camp to get back into a rhythm. Also, we got started on a Weather On the Move Unit Study that we'll be reviewing in about a month's time, so we have that to incorporate into our Science as well.
Middle School Monday - Hands-on Science @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
Just over a week ago, we did some review of what Kennady had already done, just to refresh her memory, and I updated my records of what she'd done. What a relief to discover we weren't as behind as I'd feared! There were several hands-on activities that she'd skipped for one reason or another, so we started looking at those.

One was a hygrometer. A hygrometer is an instrument to measure the humidity in the air, and we'd attempted making one last summer using hair. It didn't work. Possibly because it was humid to start with? That was our theory. Anyway, I had told Kennady we'd give it another try during the winter, when we could start on a dry day and then take the hair hygrometer into a steamy hot bathroom right after someone had showered, and then we'd see if it worked better. And all winter long, we either postponed or forgot about that. Then, recently I stumbled across another easy homemade hygrometer demonstration for kids - done with pinecones! Well, we've got lots of pinecones lying around our yard, so we abandoned the hair method completely and tried pinecones.
Middle School Monday - Hands-on Science @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
We collected a selection of pinecones from our yard, and tried two different kinds. We had much better luck with one over the other (Here's the promised update! The tighter cones in the picture above, the ones that didn't work so great, were from a Weeping Spruce. The ones that worked really well were from a White Pine.). Once you've selected your pinecones, you'll need two mason jars. Fill one with warm water. Then put the pinecones into the jars - one into the jar with warm water, and one into the empty jar. We set the lids on top of the jars as well. After fifteen minutes, take the pinecones out and observe. The pinecone in the water closed up, while the one in the empty jar was unchanged. This is because the cone is designed to open up and disperse the seeds inside when the air is dry, and to close and protect the seeds inside when the air is damp. (I found this experiment, and several others on the Hooked On Science Weather page.)
Middle School Monday - Hands-on Science @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com   Middle School Monday - Hands-on Science @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

We chose two cones that were similar. It does look like one is more open than the other, but these were the closest.
Middle School Monday - Hands-on Science @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Fifteen minutes or so in the jars...
Middle School Monday - Hands-on Science @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

and the difference is now very obvious!
Middle School Monday - Hands-on Science @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
This demonstration really just showed the effect of moisture in the air on the pinecone, and didn't have the extra step of making a scale to compare humidity from one day to another. But you can make that kind of hygrometer with a pinecone as well, which we might do (we'll have to make sure to find insect-free pinecones. We did this outside because there were little creepy crawlies inside the pinecones! Eeeeewwww.)  I found instructions for this more detailed Pinecone Weather Experiment at The Happy Scientist.

In addition to doing some more science reading, we also did the simple Cloud In a Jar demonstration as well. This seems to be one of those demonstrations that even big kids enjoy. Put some water in a jar with a lid, set inside a pan of water and heat gently. Then put a baggie of ice cubes on top of the jar lid. I couldn't get a decent picture, but you should be able to see the water condensing near the top of the jar as the water vapor meets the cooled air, and a small "cloud" form.
Middle School Monday - Hands-on Science @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Middle School Monday - Hands-on Science @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Middle School Monday - Hands-on Science @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

In the Weather On the Move Unit Study, the project of making a terrarium was suggested, because a terrarium with live plants is a closed environment with its own water cycle. We purchased a terrarium jar and are collecting up the supplies to do this project, so hopefully I will have a picture of that to share sometime soon! I'm also hoping we can fit in a field trip to the TV and radio station we've visited a couple times in the past so that Kennady can see how the weather reports are put together for the news broadcasts.

What have you done in Science class lately?Leave a comment and let me know!

Each week I invite bloggers to share their posts about middle school here on Middle School Monday. The link is open through the end of the month, and I will do my best to visit, comment, and share your posts. Please grab the Middle School Monday button to add to your post or to your sidebar when you leave your link below, and please visit the other links and comment or share. I look forward to seeing what you and your middle schoolers are doing!
Middle School Monday at Homeschool Coffee Break

Please visit your neighbors, leave comments, and share!






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 ©2006-2015 Homeschool Coffee Break. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. http://kympossibleblog.blogspot.com/

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Homeschool Weekly - Real Life Edition

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Homeschool Weekly - Real Life Edition @kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
In our homeschool... true to form, "real life" in several forms got in the way of our getting everything done that I'd planned to in our homeschool, but it was a good week anyway. Landon informed me that he was indeed right on track in his Health/Nutrition course, and he is also doing fine with World History and with Drafting. He spent a fair amount of time reading this week, as he needed to do some catching up with Literature. He got some Algebra done, but we didn't do any Grammar this week. Oops. We did have good intentions, but that doesn't count!

Kennady worked on Science, Geography, Literature, and some Math, so she is in pretty good shape. I didn't spent a great deal of time working with her because I was trying to make sure all her grades were up to date and her report card was done. No surprise - she had straight A's again. 
Homeschool Weekly - Real Life Edition @kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
Making a cloud in a jar.
In other news... I don't really have much to share, as it was just a rather ordinary week! Kennady did go to a sleepover party for a friend's birthday yesterday. Today is very busy - after picking up Kennady this morning, I will be taking her to a choir performance shortly. Landon is working today, and Spencer will be working this evening, while the hubster and I are going to a dinner party. We're headed in several different directions!

And Harrison had a job interview this week, and has another scheduled for this coming week, but that is his news more than mine, and we don't know much other than that he is in the running for these jobs. We're praying that he has wisdom about which offer, if they're extended, he should accept, because there are moves and many other things to consider. If he does move away, it means a lot of changes for the family... and some difficult decisions as well.

Things that made me smile... before bringing Kennady home after her sleepover party, we got to go see the horse that the friend and her mom help care for. All the girls were delighted to spend some time with the horses and each got a turn brushing. He's a beauty, isn't he?
Homeschool Weekly - Real Life Edition @kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Homeschool Weekly - Real Life Edition @kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

34 Weeks of Clean...
I'm participating in a weekly challenge and link-up at Family, Faith, and Fridays but this was another easy week for me. The assignment was to tidy up our Arts and Crafts supplies and working area. Our supplies - believe it or not - are fairly well contained, and since we don't have a dedicated area for working on them at this time, I took a breather!

 During Week 15,  we're going to be tackling our Master Bedrooms! Goodness. Don't expect "before" pictures from me, that's all I can say! For the details of the assignment, go to Family, Faith, and Fridays. Join in if you haven't already, and check back next week for our progress!

I recommend... visiting all the participating blogs in this past week's Real Life Homeschool blog hop! My own series was "The Real Homeschoolers of Carroll County"
Real Life Homeschool Blog Hop

On my blog this week...

On the bookshelf...

Brigid of Ireland by Cindy Thomson
The Crimson Cord: Rahab's Story by Jill Eileen Smith
A Place Beyond Courage by Elizabeth Chadwick

I didn't review anything new on my book blog this week, but you can check out what's going on over there. You'll find it at Just A Second.

A parting shot...
Homeschool Weekly - Real Life Edition @kympossibleblog.blogspot.com


Weekly Wrap-Up

      For the Display of His Splendor


   
This post is linked at Weird, Unsocialized Homeschoolers, at Home to 4 Kiddos, and at For the Display of His SplendorI'm also sharing on the Homeschool Mother's Journal co-hosted by the following blogs: Managing Your BlessingsThe Heart of MichelleContented at HomeNext Gen Homeschool; and Abundant Life.

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 ©2006-2015 Homeschool Coffee Break. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. http://kympossibleblog.blogspot.com/

Friday, April 10, 2015

The Real Homeschool Mom

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the Real Homeschoolers series - The Real Homeschool Mom @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Earlier this week in The Real Homeschoolers series I told you some strange comments we've heard about "socialization" for homeschool kids. Today I've got a few comments that reveal the misconceptions about homeschool moms that are out there. Some of these might apply to other homeschool moms, but certainly not all of us. A lot of the time, these comments come from moms that are not homeschooling in the form of their reason why they couldn't do it, which reveals what they think those of us who are doing it are like. So, once again, I give you real comments that others have made to me, a sampling of what I'd like to say, and the truth.

I wouldn't have the patience... you must have a lot more patience than I do!
What I'm thinking: BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!
The truth: I don't have any more patience than the average mom, maybe less. I don't think homeschool moms have the market cornered on patience. Some days go smoothly and other days... not so much. Some days are one frustration after another. You do not need to master patience before homeschooling any more than you need to have perfect patience before you become a parent. The process of parenting and homeschooling is teaching me patience all the time though! But on my own, I've got no patience. By the help of the Holy Spirit, I'm learning patience.
the Real Homeschoolers series - The Real Homeschool Mom @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
Oh, I'm smiling, but see all those grey hairs? EARNED. Every one of them.
It would drive me crazy to have my kids around all the time! How do you get any time to yourself?
What I'm thinking is a combination of: Why did you even have kids, if you don't want them around? How do you think I got this crazy? What is this "time to myself" of which you speak?
The truth: Of course kids drive their parents crazy at times - it goes with the territory. Kids of all ages do things that get on a parent's last nerve, and homeschool families are not immune to it. What's different is that since we do spend so much time together, we do have to learn to live with each other. There are fewer opportunities for homeschooled kids to pick up the bad habits and attitudes of every other kid their age. They mostly learn their bad habits from Mom. And believe me, that does drive a mother crazy on a couple of levels!! But seriously. Having family time is one of the ideals that most parents want - homeschooling helps us do that, and we have the time to truly disciple our kids. Do they still misbehave and make us want to tear our hair out? Absolutely. We just have a little more control over questionable influences, and a lot more opportunity to train kids according to our values and standards of behavior. And yes, I LOVE being with my kids. Most of the time.

But of course, everyone needs a break, so about the "time to yourself" portion of this... the truth is, that can be a big challenge for homeschool moms. It's not a big deal for me now because my kids are older and not underfoot 24/7, but when I had two students and a preschooler and a baby... Oy. But we learn to deal. Participating in a co-op worked for a lot of years. I was a teacher or helper in a small co-op classroom for two of the class periods, and got to hang out in the "teacher's lounge" for a third. My kids have been in a homeschool gym class for years now, and although it's expected that each mom is available once or twice during a semester to provide some crowd control, generally that is a block of free time if I want or need it. I meet monthly with a group of homeschool moms for Encouragement Group. We get together for coffee and conversation, and do just what the name says - encourage one another. And on an everyday basis, I prioritize my morning coffee time to read Scripture and get started on the day quietly and by myself.
the Real Homeschoolers series - The Real Homeschool Mom @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
How do you get your kids to listen to you?
What I'm thinking: I'm not sure they do listen to me... sometimes I really wonder...
The truth: Basically, see my answer to the above question. Also... I don't have to get their attention in a noisy classroom; I talk to them one-on-one. And the flipside is that they don't have to raise their hand before asking me a question. Other than that, I get my kids to listen to me about doing their schoolwork the same way any parent gets their kids to listen to them about taking out the trash or feeding the dog. Which is to say that sometimes they listen and sometimes they don't. This question is also about whether my kids accept me as an authority on history or math or whatever they are studying, so let's go there...

How do you know what to teach?
What I'm thinking: A lot of times I don't. I pray and research and hope for the best.
The truth: I pray; I research; I hunt for curriculum; I compare resources and textbooks. I even consult standards of what is supposed to be covered in each grade. And then I do my best to find a curriculum that is a good fit for my student, and we learn as we go. In subjects that aren't my strength, sometimes I only need to be one step ahead of my student, and sometimes all I need to be able to do is understand the Answer Key. If a subject is way out of my comfort zone, I get help. Maybe a co-op class, or a tutor. Maybe an online curriculum. Maybe dual enrollment at the community college. The bottom line is that a homeschool mom doesn't need to be an expert in every subject, and doesn't need to worry about how to teach Calculus when her kid is still in Kindergarten. We figure out a lot of this stuff as we go! I mean, I do like to think that I'm intelligent and well-read, but I don't have a Masters in Everything, so I know my limits. Actually, I'd like to get a Masters in Everything, if I could just find a college that offered that degree.
the Real Homeschoolers series - The Real Homeschool Mom @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
You must be so organized.
What I'm thinking: Oh my word. Apparently, you have not been in my house.
The truth: Some homeschool moms are super-organized. I think it's an individual personality trait, not a standard homeschool mom trait. I am not that mom. I wish my desk and my bookshelves --- and well, my whole house, really --- were neatly organized with pretty bins and labels, a place for everything and everything in its place. But it is not a natural ability of mine. I settle for mostly functional. Homeschooling does mean I have to maintain a certain level of organization and record-keeping just so we know what we're doing, and so we can comply with the law. I do like to make lesson plans and check things off lists, and I enjoy keeping track of all the things we do for school; so I guess in that sense I am organized. I rely heavily on my beloved Homeschool Tracker (which looks so neat and tidy) and notebooks full of my continually updated and scribbled-upon handwritten lesson plans and ideas (which do not look neat and tidy in the least). We do keep our schoolwork in some semblance of organization out of necessity, but honestly I'm forgetful and my filing system is actually more of an artful stacking system. Which reminds me... I need to make sure I have my report card and paperwork to deliver when I go out later today. I'd better go put it with my purse now, so I don't forget it. And maybe I should write myself a sticky note too, just to be sure. Now where are my sticky notes? I can't find a pen that works.... Oh goodness, it's later than I thought. I'd better get this done so I can help Kennady with Science...

Wow, that's a big commitment. I really admire you for doing that. 
What I'm thinking: Yes, it is a big commitment. But I don't know how to respond to the admiration.
The truth; Yes, it is a big commitment. Being a parent is a big commitment, and as far as we're concerned, education is part of the parenting commitment package. We feel that the calling to train up our children in the way they should go (Proverbs 22:6) included a call to homeschool. So really, we are just following through on that conviction. If you compliment me for homeschooling, thank you. Don't feel sorry for me though. Sometimes I get the weird vibe that someone thinks that I'm some martyr because I homeschool. Guys, this is a JOY! It's a joy and a privilege, and a source of blessing! Even though there are challenges and days that are just hard and discouraging, it's most often a delight to be doing what I do. And on those hard days when I'm really not feeling it, I still have the assurance that we are doing what God called us to do.
the Real Homeschoolers series - The Real Homeschool Mom @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

And for real? I do not even know how to put my hair in a bun.

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©2006-2015 Homeschool Coffee Break. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author.http://kympossibleblog.blogspot.com/